Friday, November 21, 2014

What Do Kids Want?

Teachers know that the best way for our students to learn is to make it enjoyable. Sometimes, this is a challenge since not everyone likes the same thing. This video, What Kids Want Out of School?, of middle school students shows what our leaners would like. The answer to this is we attempt to make tasks inquiry based, meaning we allow students to make guided choices about what they want to learn. We also like to ensure our students have an authentic voice in the process.

This links to my former posting about reading contests. For the Golden Dragon Book Award I'm using Google Classroom to stay organized. To further motivate my students and encourage them to build a reading community I'm giving my students different options to share their opinions.

Currently, the students are expected to evaluate their books using criteria set by myself and I created a template for them to use and an example video (seen below). They need to discuss the genre, characters, author's style, connections and a recommendation. However, they do have some choices as to how the present their work. At the end of the project, I'm aiming for them to create their own criteria lists.

Students who are introverted and want to express themselves through writing may use Destiny Quests Review function and post a written review. Students who are more visual and extroverted may express themselves through a video (here's the link to my template).  If they are somewhere in the middle and don't want themselves in the video then they can use a powtoon or animoto template.

My goal for next week is to set up a library youtube channel so the students can see the videos and eventually make a QR code to more students can watch the videos.

My journey to make a community of readers is to be continued!

Friday, November 7, 2014

Something Old, Something New

Book Contests are not new on the library block. They are a great way to motivate kids to read books outside the genre comfort zone as well as incorporate authentic reviews that other kids will read. The students will be inquiring into what makes an award winning book.

Google classroom, well that's new and I'm going to attempt to keep the kids and myself organized using Google Classroom. This contest is spread across 2 grade levels and will have approximately 40 kids. Students are expected to complete a google form that is a brief review that will help me to track which titles are being read. The brief review includes title, genre, a scale rating and a couple of sentences to inspire others to read it, or not read it. Also included in the classroom are some videos about the contest, book trailers and the contenders. Eventually, mini assignments about character, theme, plot, connections and perspective will be posted.

Hopefully, this combination of old and new will inspire the students to read some great upcoming literature.


Saturday, November 1, 2014

Why Halloween is a Librarian's Dream Come True

Halloween, a holiday filled with creative characters and storylines that will haunt readers of all ages. The books were flying of the shelves this week. Creepy character discussions were rich and diverse, topics included different characteristics of vampires, how witches can be good and evil and how to do skeletons talk.

Students love the suspense found in Halloween tales and there's many great books at appropriate levels to introduce the concept of the horror genre. It's also the time of year when I practice my oral story telling by sharing my personal ghost story, it is suitable only for upper elementary and leaves them guessing as to whether I'm telling them the truth. The wonder if they should be believers, which I think is a sign of a good ghost story!

Many sneer at this American tradition but I'm thankful to be back in a place where you're allowed to embrace this fun occasion. School spirits were high and the library was definitely a participant. Students found books to match their costume and this was a great assessment to see who knew how to use library signage or the catalogue, in fact it was a great assessment for every grade level. Teachers supported by participating in a door decorating contest featuring a favorite class title, although this particular event didn't have to be connected to the Halloween theme.




Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Preparation for Character Day

The students of all ages were challenged with finding a book of their favourite characters, and it could match their Halloween costume. This twist meant that students had to do a little more searching and allowed me to assess their skills on using library signage and the catalogue.

We had many happy customers, although I soon discovered that I don't have many devil books in the collection and was pleasantly surprised that I wasn't overwhelmed with princess or superhero requests. Many students got creative and took skeleton books from the Dewey section or a Sleepy Hallow Book from the Fairy Tale section. There was quite a diversity!

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Character Day: Celebrate Great Characters and Build Empathy

Children love to talk about characters, whether it be from a book, movie or TV show. They make those great connections to themselves, others, books and the world.Conversations about how characters face problems helps children to build empathy. Not just any book will do this, it needs to be quality literary fiction with complex characters . 

Sharing quality books with characters experiencing a range of emotions reassures a child that challenges in life happen to others and they are not alone in feelings. Topics that seem frightening shouldn't be shied away from, but rather embraced since it helps children to realize and be prepared for the emotions that come from life's little upsets. There's a theory that raising children to be readers will result in a more peaceful society. Seeing the world through a character's eyes helps children to have a broader picture of the world than their own personal community.

Librarians have various tricks to help students explore great literature and good characters. My latest venture is to have a character day. The idea is students choose a great character, find a book and talk about it with others. Character Days aren't a new idea, but they are fun, effective and great way to bring a school community together.

My Top 10 Favourite Books to Build the Attitude Empathy

 






Thursday, October 2, 2014

Books that All Kids Can Enjoy

A while ago I attended an IB webinar on International Mindedness. Webinars are a great way for teachers to get some quick professional development from the comfort of our living room. And, you can join them even if you're not currently at an IB school.

The course I attended was run by a fabulous PYP Coordinator/ Vice Principal / Friend Andrean Holmberg Strachan and her elementary librarian, who I forget the name of (forgive me!) and the work at the Canadian International School of Singapore. The librarian generously shared her list and I've since added titles that I found in my current library.

These titles create great discussion during knee to knee or think pair share chats. Students of all ages can relate to the different perspectives and learn that inclusion and appreciation of differences is important.

My Top 5 Favourite International Mindedness Books 

(in order of age appropriateness)





Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Showing Off Our International Community

In honour of the UN's International Day of Peace our English as an Additional Language team helped our students to create a great Museum of Culture.  The students discussed aspects of their country and culture and many brought in items from their home to share and display.

As a librarian, I helped by getting some books and the books aren't limited to books about countries or maps, there are cookbooks, craft books, fairy tales and celebrations.

It was a great way for students to really delve into 'Who We Are' and to feel pride about where they are from. Well done AISB!